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Endocrine Active Substances Information System (EASIS)

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In December 1999, the European Commission adopted a Community Strategy for Endocrine Disrupters, focusing on short, medium and long-term actions. A key short-term action was to establish a priority list of substances for further evaluation of their role in endocrine disruption.

Based on the output of four study contracts commissioned over the period 2000-2007, the Directorate-General for the Environment  (DG ENV) developed a database covering 428 substances suspected of having the potential for endocrine disruption. Although it has no normative or pre-normative implications, this database has proven useful in providing stakeholders with a significant amount of information on potential endocrine disrupters. However, one of the limitations of the database in its current form is that it is static in nature, and does not allow information to be introduced or updated.

In September 2010, the Joint Research Centre - Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (JRC-IHCP) received a mandate from DG ENV to take over the work already done and develop it further towards a Web-based Information System on Endocrine Active Substances (EAS). As part of its activities in support of the implementation of the Community Strategy on Endocrine Disrupters, the JRC-IHCP has therefore:

  • taken over from DG ENV the existing database with the results of the 2000-2007 studies;  
  • started a project aimed at developing a new database, which could be easily consulted and updated with new (research) findings on EAS via the web
  • started looking at integrating the new database into a Web Portal, so as to provide easy access to additional resources, such as other databases and modelling tools

On this website you can both download the existing database and keep yourself informed about the development of the new one.

 

Download the existing European Commission database

To extract the database, please, follow these instructions:
1. Download the zip zipped file to your hard-disk
2. Unzip the file and run the database (by a double-click on EDS_2003_DHI2006.mdb).
3. Minimum requirement: Microsoft Access 2003 or later. 

 

Follow the main steps in the development of the new EAS Database and Web Portal

In October 2010, the JRC-IHCP organised an International Workshop in Ispra, aimed at collecting a wide range of views about existing needs for collecting and sharing information and data on EAS.
Workshop Report was published, containing a list of recommendations. In parallel, a review report  on existing similar and/or complementary (IT) information sources on EAS was compiled. The above elements were then used as input for a Vision Document, which was aimed at providing a high-level description of the future IT system which would also take practical aspects and constraints into account. This "vision" is currently being worked upon to prepare technical specifications, which will eventually lead to the final product. 

In addition, the following steps have been undertaken:

  • A feasibility study on transferring the content of the European Commission Database to a new system based on the OECD Harmonised Templates has been carried out. A short summary of this analysis is available here
  • The IHCP has taken the lead of an international initiative for the development of a new OECD Harmonised Template (designated as "OHT 201" by the OECD) for reporting on intermediate toxicological effects at the molecular level. This will provide a more robust way of directly reporting on "upstream" endocrine activity of chemicals, thereby allowing to capture results which associate a substance with a particular "key" biological event linked with one or more modes-of-action that may eventually lead to one or more adverse health outcomes. This would include for example the data which are typically generated using in vitro and computational methods (e.g. potential for receptor binding and initiating gene transcription).

On 11-12 June 2012 the European Commission's Directorate-General for the Environment organised a conference on endocrine disruptors in close collaboration with the JRC-IHCP. The JRC-IHCP supported the organisation of the event and contributed actively by chairing sessions and acting as rapporteur. Information on the development of the Endocrine Active Substances Information System (EASIS) being undertaken by the JRC-IHCP was also communicated by a poster:

 

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